Non-Surgical Alternatives for Dogs with ACL/CCL Injury

While custom orthotic and prosthetic devices have been around for centuries, with the American prosthetic device field beginning during the American Civil War (1861-1865), the notion of fabricating custom braces and prosthetic devices for animals has only recently become popularized, thanks to a specialized group of healthcare providers.

ACL injuries for canines (technically referred to as  the Cranial Cruciate Ligament or CCL for dogs) and other animals are an unfortunate result of wear and tear, birth abnormalities, or traumatic injury that often leads to surgical procedures costing upwards of $2,500-5,000.   However, due to the animals age and ability to tolerate medication and a surgical procedure as well as the owner’s ability to afford a costly medical procedure, surgery is not a viable option for many.

Runt Long walk up a rampCanine Stifle Brace

Photos courtesy of OrthoPets V-OP Veterinary Clinic, Denver, Colorado USA

The fabrication of custom orthosis by a qualified Orthotist provides animals with either short term mobility before a surgical procedure, support for the healing limb after surgery, or an effective alternative to surgery.  The decision about whether to proceed with surgery or consider orthotic bracing should be discussed between the animal’s owner, their local Veterinarian, and an Orthotists who specializes in the fabrication  and delivery of custom bracing for animals.

To provide a convenient  way for pet owners and Veterinarians to connect with Orthotists and Prosthetists around the world who specialize in fabricating custom devices for animals, we’ve put together a website, called Animal Orthotic and Prosthetic Resources (link: http://animaloandp.com/). 

AnimalOandP.com  contains information about veterinary orthotic & prosthetic devices, a White Paper to help educate pet owners and Veterinarians about custom orthopedic bracing for animals, and contact information for veterinary Orthotists and Prosthetists around the world.

To begin your pet’s rehabilitation journey, we recommend consulting one of the providers listed on AnimalOandP.com to learn more about your pet’s veterinary bracing options.  Although many Veterinarians are unfamiliar with orthotic bracing (it is still a relatively new concept in Veterinary medicine),  a veterinary orthotic & prosthetic device provider will be able to connect you with a Veterinarian who’s willing to work with you to discuss the benefits of  this safe, effective, and low cost surgical alternative.

Disclaimer:  Tamarack Habilitation Technologies, Inc. and the Tamarack Wellness NewsWire  claim no expertise in Veterinary medicine and animal rehabilitation.  We recommend consulting with a licensed Veterinarian or specialty veterinary medicine professional whenever making decisions related to your animal’s health and rehabilitation needs.

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2 thoughts on “Non-Surgical Alternatives for Dogs with ACL/CCL Injury

  1. Yes! I, too, very much support non-surgical treatment for pets when it makes sense. That was the situation I found myself in when my dog tore his ACL. He’s an older dog and I knew a super invasive surgery like the ACL surgery, would be too much for him to handle. I researched a lot and bought a brace from WoundWear. It’s really great that there are more and more non-surgical options like WoundWear or OrthoPets braces. I’m pretty sure it saved my dog’s life! 🙂

  2. This article was great! And it helps people like me who don’t have a clue about these sort of injuries 😦 My dog, Duke, tore his acl a couple weeks ago and I really didn’t want to put him through surgery because he is an older dog. So, I had to look for other options. I ended up getting him an a-trac brace from Woundwear and it has been awesome! Duke is doing so much better and I am glad surgery wasn’t the only option.

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